Créer une licence « Creative Commons » du Canada

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Submitted by RobWiebe 2010-05-14 16:52:18 EDT

Theme: Canada's Digital Content
Idea Status: +26 | Total Votes: 30 | Comments: 6

Le Canada devrait envisager une autre façon de protéger les auteurs d'œuvres originales, tout en favorisant la créativité et de stimuler la distribution de leurs œuvres.

L'internet offre des possibilités pour créer et distribuer du contenu numérique et des nouveaux services, mais notre système actuel du droit d'auteur inhibe cette activité. Il est trop rigide, ambigu et n'est plus respecté parce qu’il limite la façon dont le contenu numérique peut être consulté et partagé.

Les licences Creative Commons sont faciles à comprendre. Elles donnent des façons d'étendre le droit d'auteur pour promouvoir le partage et la modification légale d'œuvres originales. Les licences Creative Commons sont personnalisables et elles ont des conditions d'utilisation claires. Elles ont été déjà testés au tribunal international et sont disponibles gratuitement.

La valeur du contenu numérique est en croissance et de l'information numérique au Canada devrait être plus accessible et partageable. Pour y réussir, les créateurs de contenu doivent renoncer à certains droits pour obtenir d'autres avantages en retour. Ceci c’est l’avantage des licences Creative Commons.

Le Canada devrait envisager une autre façon de protéger les auteurs d'œuvres originales, tout en favorisant la créativité et de stimuler la distribution de leurs œuvres.

L'internet offre des possibilités pour créer et distribuer du contenu numérique et des nouveaux services, mais notre système actuel du droit d'auteur inhibe cette activité. Il est trop rigide, ambigu et n'est plus respecté parce qu’il limite la façon dont le contenu numérique peut être consulté et partagé.

Les licences Creative Commons sont faciles à comprendre. Elles donnent des façons d'étendre le droit d'auteur pour promouvoir le partage et la modification légale d'œuvres originales. Les licences Creative Commons sont personnalisables et elles ont des conditions d'utilisation claires. Elles ont été déjà testés au tribunal international et sont disponibles gratuitement.

La valeur du contenu numérique est en croissance et de l'information numérique au Canada devrait être plus accessible et partageable. Pour y réussir, les créateurs de contenu doivent renoncer à certains droits pour obtenir d'autres avantages en retour. Ceci c’est l’avantage des licences Creative Commons.

Comments


patrickgwelch — 2010-05-16 14:46:16 EDT wrote

A. Rough Google translation of suggestion into english

Create a license Creative Commons Canada

Canada should consider another way to protect authors of original works, while encouraging creativity and stimulating the distribution of their works.

The Internet offers opportunities to create and distribute digital content and new services, but our current system of copyright inhibits this activity. It is too rigid, ambiguous and is no longer respected because it limits how digital content can be accessed and shared.

Creative Commons licenses are easy to understand. They provide ways to extend the copyright to promote the sharing and the statutory change of original works. Creative Commons licenses are customizable and they have clear terms of use. They have already been tested in an international court and are freely available.

The value of digital content is growing and the Canadian digital information should be more accessible and shareable. To succeed, content creators must give up certain rights to obtain other benefits in return. This is the advantage of Creative Commons licenses.

B. I agree with RobWiebe, the Canadian Government should encourage the use of various "liberal" (copyleft, open, free, etc.) copyright licenses such as the creative commons licenses.

Just think, performing the simple act of translating a suggestion, comment, article, etc… into another language, as I have done here (albeit poorly and with google translate), so as to broaden the audience and impact, is illegal in the traditional copyright world unless one receives explicit permission. What a ridiculous and backwards concept for the 21st century. Now that the digital world is tiny, let us not legislate/build artificial legal walls to separate the worlds people.


infzy — 2010-05-17 00:37:56 EDT wrote

I agree with all the statements in the post. It's the title I don't understand: "Create a license" — I'm not sure what he's getting at.

In my opinion, the Canadian government should change copyright by vastly reducing its mandate; the copyright owner has WAY too much power in the current system, to the extent that innovation and free speech are significantly impaired. Also, the Government should relinquish copyright on all of its works (no "crown copyright"), and should mandate that government-contracted works are also released to the public (including, for example, government software contracts).

I'm not sure where "creating" a unique Creative Commons license for Canada would fit into anything, so I assume that's not what the poster of this idea meant. I agree with all his statements though so here's an upvote from me.


saneconsulting — 2010-05-19 03:03:52 EDT wrote

I believe the concept of a "Creative Commons" license is fairly well understood in the software development world. I am not a copyright expert but the general concept of promoting a Creative Commons license is certainly a good idea. But I'm uncertain as the envisioned application of this proposed license by RobWiebe.

I would also suggest, depending on the specific application of copyright under consideration, there may be other good open/free licenses that could be more appropriate (GNU Public License for example)


mcouture — 2010-05-19 10:22:07 EDT wrote

Le titre est trompeur. La version canadienne des licences Creative Commons existe déjà. Bien qu'elles pourraient être améliorées (notamment en ce qui touche la traduction française et la transposition de certains concepts juridiques états-uniens), elles n'ont pas à être créées. Il faut plutôt les faire connaître et encourager leur utilisation.


dsanden — 2010-06-16 18:55:48 EDT wrote

Q. Are there are some gaps and conundrums in copyright and patent law? For example group copyright and group patent? I work in opensource, which is good for groups, but what if we want non-opensource and still everyone who contributes in the group is covered automatically in an ongoing way? And infzy's comment "too much power" — it's hard to be truly creative nowadays because nearly every possible combination and permutation of words has been written. My last sentence is probably already copyright by someone and that doesn't that make sense. Lemelson-like patents (so general -written by lawyers with no inventors in sight — they cover entire fields with nuisance lawsuit threats and extort license fees — see controversy section: Jerome H. Lemelson). Same with copyright — I could raise capital, have a supercomputer generate all combinations and permutations of english and french words and copyright it all. Then sue for infringments. That doesn't make sense.


datalibre.ca · Open Data — Vote & Submit — 2010-06-19 09:39:12 EDT wrote

[…] 5. Créer une licence « Creative Commons » du Canada […]

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